Renewed Commitments in a Time of Vigilance: Sexuality Education in the USA Sex Education: Sexuality, Society and Learning

Sex Education
Now in its 17th year of publication and with an impact factor of 0.505, Sex Education provides a high quality environment in which to publish cutting edge research on sex, sexuality and relationships education. Papers come from a wide range of disciplines and have a strong international focus, appealing to researchers, policy makers and practitioners alike.
 
Published since 2001, the journal offers a unique source of scholarship on sexuality and sex education – both in school and beyond. Its pages have reflected sometimes heated debate between different positions and approaches. Regardless of its focus, each and every paper features high quality research and has been peer reviewed in line with best practice. 
 
 
Over the past 20 years, the USA has seen more than its fair share of controversy with respect to education about sexuality, sex, and intimate relationships— or what the editors of this Virtual Special Issue refer to as 'sexuality education'. Attention has focused on content (abstinence-only versus comprehensive instruction), delivery (by teachers, parents, health professionals or community educators) and context (within school and beyond).  In recognition of this fact, we share here a sample of its most impactful papers on these and related topics.
 
In a specially commissioned Editorial Introduction, Lorena Garcia and Jessica Fields reflect on the breadth and scope of papers the journal has published. They highlight leading areas of scholarship, consider the contribution of the journal’s papers to well-being and sexuality, and envision future contributions on US sexuality education.
 
Please read this sample of Sex Education’s top papers on sexuality education.  Papers will be free to access via this page until the end of 2017.
 
You can read the full virtual special issue introduction here
 
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Continued Investment in School-Based Instruction

Beyond the Classroom

Intersectionality