Testimonials International Journal of Leadership in Education: Theory & Practice

International Journal of Leadership in Education

Dr. Hilary Lustick, Texas State University, San Marcos, TX
Assistant Professor, Educational Leadership and School Improvement Programs
Department of Counseling, Leadership, Adult Education, & School Psychology
2015

One of the most daunting tasks, as a PhD student, is writing for publication. It is the first time – perhaps in your life, but definitely in your academic career – where you are not writing with the security of knowing there will be a grade or some kind of definitive explanation of why what you wrote was successful or not in getting your point across. As I sat down two years ago to write my first article, I felt like I was writing for an audience I would never know and would likely never hear from. I worked on two manuscripts: one for regular submission, and one for consideration in the International Journal for Leadership in Education's Emergent Scholar Manuscript Competition. Both projects were daunting, but it made such a difference to know I would receive feedback and an answer from the International Journal for Leadership in Education even if I did not receive an award. The requirement that I integrate IJLE articles into my citations meant acquainting myself with the voices of its previous authors, and I felt that, by the end of the project, I had a strong sense of IJLE's readership, leadership, and values. Of course, receiving the award was an incredible honor, especially because it meant receiving an in-person certificate at the editorial meeting, and meeting a full staff and cast of faculty excited to talk to me about my ideas. But the process overall was an invaluable opportunity to practice crafting my work to reach a particular audience within the broader field. I would heartily encourage any doctoral student in educational leadership to submit a manuscript to this contest as an exercise in writing and submission. It is rare to get such specific guidelines in the world of academic publishing, and we have so much to gain from the experience.

 

Dr. Juan Niño, University of Texas at San Antonio
Assistant Professor, Educational Leadership and Policy Studies
2013

My experience with the International Journal of Leadership in Education has been instrumental to my success as a junior faculty member. I was honored to be selected as a winner for the Emergent Scholars Manuscript Competition. This recognition has been the greatest accomplishment of my career. I received valuable support and mentorship from the editor that helped strengthened my work. I want to thank the International Journal of Leadership in Education for providing an opportunity for early career scholars to publish our work in an international setting. I can personally attest that the International Journal of Leadership in Education provided impetus to my career and I strongly recommend junior scholars to submit their work to the International Journal of Leadership in Education’s manuscript competition.

 

Dr. Hugo Ibarra, Ben Milam Elementary School, Bryan, TX
Principal
2012

Participating and winning first prize in the Emergent Scholar Manuscript Competition is one of those exhilarating yet humbling experiences that has significantly impacted my career as a researcher and as a practitioner. While scholarly journal subscriptions are not uncommon among educational leaders, one does not always have the advantage of collaborating with a journal, where originality and cutting-edge writing converge without compromising quality and thoroughness in publications such as the International Journal of Leadership in Education. The International Journal of Leadership in Education remains relevant and maintains impressive connectivity with the world it studies by inviting scholars and practitioners to contribute to it with topics that are critical to education, from a variety of perspectives, with different points of view, and from different parts of the world. Regardless of previous experiences with academic writing and scholarly publications, winning first prize in the Emergent Scholar Manuscript Competition was a unique opportunity that brought forth the satisfaction experienced when creating new knowledge or discovering new angles to what is already known, and the complexities and professionalism of purposeful peer-reviewed and critical writing.