Editors' Choice Award Teaching and Learning in Medicine

Teaching and Learning in Medicine

Each year, the Editors’ Choice selection process offers a welcome opportunity to reflect, as an Editorial Board, on what we value in medical education inquiry at Teaching and Learning in Medicine (TLM) and how we can maintain the journal’s alignment with what we hold dear. The selection criteria we have used for the past three years were developed to choose an article that represents exemplary fit to the journal’s mission to “provide the theoretical foundations and practical analysis needed for effective educational decision making.” These criteria are:

  • Impact on Theory – The perceived degree to which the article helps build explanations, illuminate the role of context, and/or promote the asking of new questions. Outstanding articles according to this criterion go beyond providing new knowledge to promote new understanding.
     
  • Impact on Practice – The perceived degree to which the article enables educators to design or implement something with confidence that it will work in their setting. Outstanding articles according to this criterion go beyond providing insight on how to do something to fuel capacity to educate.
     
  • Innovativeness – Not all that is new is innovative. Outstanding articles according to this criterion push the boundary, going past incremental improvements or change to shifting paradigms and turning established ideas on their head.
     
  • Accessibility – Not all findings that are impactful or innovative are accessible to a wide audience. Outstanding articles according to this criterion present the material in a way that clearly indicates their utility to educational decision making and their importance to theoretical understanding.

The Terrill A. Mast TLM Foundation makes the Editors’ Choice Award program possible, and we are grateful for the chance to step back and appreciate what our previous year’s publications have uniquely contributed to moving the field forward. Per foundation stipulations, the award must be given to a research article (i.e., published in the Investigations, Groundwork, and Validation categories), although we believe the full range of our offerings enriches the scholarly discussion, providing thought-provoking Observations as well as Educational Case Reports that promote deeper understanding of academic innovation.

This year two articles tied for best candidate: “Race/Ethnicity in Medical Education: An Analysis of a Question Bank for Step 1 of the US Medical Licensing Examination” (Kelsey Ripp & Lundy Braun, Vol 29, Issue 2) and “What Do Medical Students Do For Self-Care? A Student-Centered Approach to Well-Being” (Erin E. Ayala, Aisha M. Omorodion, Dennis Nmecha, Jeffrey S. Winseman, & Hyacinth R. C. Mason, Vol 29, Issue 3). All of these articles are worthy of closer examination and will be freely available throughout the rest of this year.